Review: Queen Elizabeth Park

Last Saturday we visited the Queen Elizabeth Park. We were very lucky with the weather because, after three days with rain, it was sunny again. So we were totally able to enjoy the park.

Since the park is really beautiful and the second most visited after Stanley Park, many people come there to make their wedding pictures.
We saw people playing tennis or golf and the kids were able to flounder about in the water of the fountain.
First of all we went to the highest point in the park and took nice pictures of the amazing view over the city. Later on we just walked through the park and enjoyed the nice gardens with beautiful flowers.

We found a sunny place on one of the many meadows to sit down and talked about everything and nothing. It was really fun and relaxing. The time went by fast as we were talking a lot and after three hours we went home to appease one’s hunger.

It was great to see so many new faces and I’m looking forward to see you at the next Pub Night on Wednesday again.

Click here for more pictures.

 

INTERNeX International Exchange
Suite 200 – 211 Columbia Street
Vancouver BC -V6A 2R5-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Phone: +1 (604) 662 8149
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

INTERNeX Canada: What to do on the weekend.

One Thursday more…and one weekend more is coming ! Let’s talk about some interesting activities for you.

This Saturday, we are going to Queen Elizabeth Park, located at the geographic centre of Vancouver, at the junction of Cambie Street and West 33rd Avenue.

Full of colors and different flowers,this 52 hectare  park is one of the most beautifully maintained public parks in the world. Second only to Stanley Park in annual visits, it receives nearly six-million people a year.

We can find a lot of interesting things there such as:

  • Quarry Gardens: specimen trees, shrubs, perennials, bulbs and annuals selected for their foliage, form and flowers. A stream and cascading waterfall
  • Dancing Waters: the famous fountain is comprised of 70 jets of water using 85,000 litres of recirculating water.
  • Arboretum: Canada’s first civic arboretum. The first plantings were done in 1949. The larger trees are about 60 years old. Among these is the coast redwood, which can grow to be one of the tallest trees in the world.
  • Rose Garden:was built in 1967 to commemorate Canada’s Centennial. It contains many rose varieties.
  • Sculptures: The park’s most famous is Knife Edge-Two Piece by Henry Moore. There are also four sculptures by Cameron Kerr in the plaza.

This is just some of the things we can do in Elizabeth Park, in Vancouver. You can also play tennis, basketball, rolley hockey and much more.

I hope you come with us. Join us in our Facebook event !

Best,

Mercedes

INTERNeX International Exchange
Suite 200 – 211 Columbia Street
Vancouver BC -V6A 2R5-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Phone: +1 (604) 662 8149
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

INTERNeX Canada: Picture of the week

Hey guys !! How is your weekend going?? I hope you all are re doing pretty well !!

Our picture of the week is….Clara’s Birthday !!  We took this picture on Tuesday 21st, when Clara turned 22 !! She was really happy when  she got some presents. We also ate a wonderful fruit cake…It was soooo delicious !!

In the picture you can see she looks really cute and happy with her Happy Bday’s balloon, her flowers and the little crown in her head..hahaha…Too funny !! She was a little princess !! What do you think ??

Anyway, I hope you are right now with us watching the Champions League Final at Blarney Stone…but anyway, I just remind you that tomorrow we’re going to the Grouse Mountains. Check out the event here.

I wish you have a wonderful weekend guys !

Best,

Mercedes

INTERNeX International Exchange

Suite 200 – 211 Columbia Street
Vancouver BC -V6A 2R5-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Phone: +1 (604) 662 8149
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

INTERNeX Canada: Casual Fridays

This weekend is a long one guys, because it’s Easter! When I hear Easter, I automatically think of bunnies, basket full of eggs, chocolate (of course), and flowers. But I always wondered why there are such thing as Easter bunnies? Why do they lay eggs? Where are the hens?

According to an old legend, Easter began with the pagan celebration of the goddess Ostara. She was associated with the Spring season and fertility. The goddess entertained children by turning her pet bird into a rabbit. The rabbit then gave colorful eggs as presents to the children.

If that wasn’t enough, I came across a short story for children that “tries” to explain…

Why the Easter Bunny Brings Eggs (adapted by Jean Warren)

Once upon a time, there was a King who had a very powerful magician at his court.  One day, the magician gave the King a hen that laid beautiful eggs for a present. The king liked the eggs but he was greedy and he told his magician that he would like the hen better, if she could lay eggs of gold.  So the Magician worked another magic spell and sure enough the hen started laying eggs of gold.

The king was delighted.  He became very rich and the envy of the other kings.  He kept his special hen in a golden cage next to his thrown.  He knew that someday, someone would try to steal his hen, so whenever visitors came,  he would have his magician come and hide the special hen and substitute an ordinary hen in the cage.

Sure enough, one day someone ran off with the hen in the golden cage.  The king was glad he had had his magician switch the hens.  He sent word for the magician to bring back his hen.  But the next day, when the king looked in his golden cage all he found was a white rabbit.  “What’s this!” said the King.  “Little rabbit, how did you get in here?  The King opened the cage and had his footman take the rabbit back out to the woods where he belonged.  Then he called for his magician.

“Where is my magic hen?”, asked the King.  I told you to bring her back. “I did bring her back,” said the magician.  “I put her in the cage”, I just didn’t have time to change her back into a hen.”

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This is Rolo 🙂

They never did find the little white rabbit, but from that day forward, children found colorful eggs hidden all over the kingdom.  And some say, that every once in a while someone found a golden one.

Yeah right, I don’t think so. Actually, I have two rabbits at home named Rolo and Coco..maybe they will leave trails of golden eggs and make me filthy rich 😉

Happy Easter and have a great long weekend!

Cheers,

Flora

INTERNeX International Exchange
Suite 200 – 211 Columbia Street
Vancouver BC -V6A 2R5-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Phone: +1 (604) 662 8149
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

Top 5 things to do in the Rockies!

If you are working in the Rockies or are planning to go there be sure to check out this top 5 things to do.

  1. Banff Gondola

Take the eight minute gondola ride up to the top op Sulphur Mountain to enjoy a 360° view of Banff and its surrounding peaks, Lake Minnewanka, and the Bow Valley stretching from east to west. At the top of the mountain there are several scenic hiking trails you can do. You can also encounter the local wildlife, including bighorn sheep, squirrels, marmots and many more. For only $25 you can go up and down the mountain. Looking to save a few bucks? You can also hike up the mountain. It’s a 5.5 km strenuous walk that will take you about 2-5 hours but I am willing to bet you enjoy the view so much more when you hiked up the mountain

2.   Sunshine Meadows

The Sunshine Meadows are known as the most stunning alpine setting in the Canadian Rockies. At 2220 m high, the meadows straddle the Continental Divide and the boundary between Alberta and British Columbia. Surrounded by some of the Rockies’ highest peaks, the unobstructed views are beyond compare. Wildlife around in the meadows, and the brilliance of the summer flowers and autumn larches guarantees spectacular scenery on every visit.

Spend your day on top of the world and away from the crowds at Sunshine Meadows. Mt. Assiniboine, “the Matterhorn of the Canadian Rockies”, and Banff National Park’s highest peak, can be your backdrop! A network of gentle trails wind their way through the Meadows and offer a range of walking for all abilities; from easy one and two hour strolls, to challenging full day hikes to Quartz Ridge, Healy Pass, or beyond.

3.   Tunnel mountain and Hoodoos

One of Banff national park oldest trails Tunnel Mountain is a still one of the most beautiful walks in the area. It takes about 2-3 hours to hike and it is a 4.3 km (2.7 miles) round trip. It is the smallest peak in the Rockies to be called a mountain. Standing guard around the top of the mountain are hoodoos. People looking to do this track often have two questions:

  • What are hoodoos? They are giant freestanding pillars several meters tall that are made of silt, gravel and rocks cemented together by dissolved limestone. That was the technical answer, to make it so that everyone understands here is a picture.
  • Where is the tunnel? That is the other frequently asked picture. Because the trail is called Tunnel Mountain people are wondering were the tunnel is. Well… there is no tunnel! So why did they call it tunnel mountain? That’s because of a proposal from the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1882. They wanted to blast a half mile tunnel through the hillside, but luckily they quickly decided that this was to expensive and that it would be easier to go around.

4. Lake Minnewanka

It’s the largest lake in Banff National Park at 24 km (15 miles) long and 142 m (466 ft.) deep. Only scuba divers can view the remnants of a small town called Minnewanka Landing, after a dam was built in 1941 causing the lake to rise by 30 m. But you can walk along the lakeside trail or sing up for the interpretive boat tour to learn about the history, native folk lore and geology.

5. Vermillion Lakes

This is the perfect place for a picnic lunch on the dock, with stunning views o Mount Rundle and Sulphur Mountain.There are three lakes along this road, where bald eagles nest in trees, Canadian geese breed in the marshlands and tundra swans stop by during each spring and fall migration.  A natural hot springs bubbles into

the third lake. You’ll hear the mournful whistle of the Canadian Pacific Rail trains as the cross the tracks at the far side of the lakes, a sound which has echoed through the Bow Valley for more than 100 years.

If you are a big fan of nature and love to go on hikes, the Rockies are the best designation for you.

There is so much to do and see that even if you were to live there your whole life you won’t get to see everything. But this top 5 gives you a start.

Are you in the area at the moment or have been to the Rockies and would like to add an something to our top 5? Let us know by sending an email to pr@internexcanada.com

–          Manouk

Toronto Music Garden

A taste of summer is just lingering around the corner for us! Usually when I step outside after class, I’d be welcomed by dark skies and howling winds. But now, I’m glad I don’t see much of this. The day light is extending further into the night and instead of being greeted by whips of wind, the air is much warmer and gentler.

Now, is the perfect time for us to visit the recreational parks in our neighborhood as all plant life is in its budding stage. But, a garden is just a garden, why bother spending your time in these gardens you may ask? Well, the truth is, there is an exquisite garden in Toronto that deserves your visit as it tries to visually unfold musical movements through the use of landscape.

This garden is known as the Toronto Music Garden.  The Toronto Music Garden was an inspired design by YoYo Ma, a famous cellist, and Julie Moir Messervy, a landscape architect. The garden depicts the musical movement of Bach’s Suite No.1 in G Major for unaccompanied cello. For those who are music lovers or those who are curious as to how such a garden can be ‘music’ of any sort, a visit to the Toronto Music Garden is a must.

The Toronto Music Garden is divided into 6 sub –gardens that correspond to the 6 movements of Bach’s music:

  1. Prelude: Bach’s first movement sets the mood for what is yet to come. The movement is fluid and tender which provides the audience with a sense of serenity and security. Visitors at the garden will find themselves strolling along the river bank lined with low growing plants, granite rocks and a corridor of Hackberry trees.
  2. Allemande: Allemande is a duple meter dance that originated from Germany. It is a very expressive and grave movement, but still tries to indulge in a sense of calm and gracefulness. Visitors strolling through this movement will be greeted by wandering trails and Dawn Redwood trees.
  3. Courante: Courante is a colorful, quick-paced and lively form of French and Italian dance. To captivate the essence of this mood, the garden features a swirling path of wildflowers and luscious green fields leading up a hill to the Maypole (designed by Feir Mill Design Inc.).  Here, you may find exotic, dancing butterflies and musical, singing birds.
  4. Sarabande: Based on the Spanish, slow triple time dance, the Toronto Music Garden portrays this movement through a series of tall evergreen trees lined along an inward-arc.  A huge stone is placed in the centre of the garden acting as a “poet’s corner”.
  5. Minuets: Minuets is yet another French dance. However, the difference between Minuets and Courante is that the style of Minuets is much more structured and symmetrical. As a result, visitors will find that the garden features several formal floral arrangements that circle the Music Pavilion, designed by Canadian artist, Tom Tollefson, for small orchestral and dance performances.
  6. Gigue: The Gigue takes its name from an English dance. The Gigue is cheerful, lively and very merry. The architect depicts this joyous movement through the use of vast green lands that looks onto the harbor and uses small bushes and perennials to frame a stone stage for summer performances.

When you visit Vancouver or Toronto or any big cities for that matter, you will find that typical “Botanical Garden” you should visit. How often would you find a garden designed primarily for the sake of music? The Toronto Music Garden is definitely a must see. I’m a bit disappointed that the last time I went to Toronto, all I saw was the Toronto Botanical Garden and not the Toronto Music Garden.

The Toronto Music Garden is located at 475 Queen’s Quay West between Bathurst Street and Spadina Avenue.  The cost? FREE ADMISSION.

For more information, please visit: http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/thewaterfront/parks/musicgarden.cfm#gen

Cherry Blossoms are Back!

Spring is here!

Ah…what more is there to love than seeing Vancouver’s trees blossom and bloom with pink flowers right before our eyes. That’s right, folks! It’s that time of the season again when Vancouver’s scenic landscape is covered with gorgeous pinks of cherry blossoms.  It always puts a smile on my face when I see these pink flowers glisten with the clear, blue skies behind them. My favorite cherry blossom sight seeing locations are walking down Lower Mall Street at the University of British Columbia near the Nitobe Garden and driving along Marine Drive. Reason? Mainly just because these two places are extremely accessible for me and I go to school there! Don’t fret though, these gorgeous flowers can be seen almost anywhere in Vancouver such as at Stanley Park, Queen Elizabeth Park and even in some parts of Downtown Vancouver.

Every year, the Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival Society, a non profit organization, organizes The Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival. The Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival hosts several activities where visitors and local residents can participate in to share the blooming experience. Some of their events include entering a written haiku piece in the “Haiku Invitational Competition” and also, riding bikes in the “Bike the Blossoms” event on April 17th.

So, if you fancy writing a haiku about cherry blossoms, you should enter your submission on the VCBF website before May 31st.

And, if you are interested in viewing cherry blossoms while partaking in a great bike expedition, hurry and register with the Vancouver Area Cycling Coalition now! Each ride will cost $10 and participants can check in anytime between 10:00 AM and 12:30 PM.

For more information about the haiku competition, please visit: http://vcbf.ca/
And to register for the “Bike the Blossoms” event, please visit: http://www.greatrides.ca/

For more information about the haiku competition, please visit: http://vcbf.ca/