What to do on the weekend?

Hands up if you’re ready to do something you’ll regret this weekend. Go forth! You have my blessing. Weekends don’t count unless you spend them doing something completely fun. If you still have no idea what you will regret, I have some things listed down to make your weekend great.

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For people who love skiing or snowboarding this will be a good weekend. Why? The Grouse Grind and Mt. Seymour are opening the ski season this weekend. You can get your lift passes with a discount and try the first snow of this fall.

Weekends don’t pay as well as weekdays but at least there’s hockey and to make it even better, there is not one but two games you can enjoy. The Giants will show what they can do on Saturday and Sunday. If you are not a real hockey fan, you probably aren’t Canadian. You can go to the market on Sunday instead. Cannery’s farmers market in Richmond or Hastings Park Winter Farmers Market will be the best options for you to go.

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This Saturday is Remembrance Day. Remembrance Day is a memorial day since the end of the First World War to remember the members of the armed forces who have died in the line of duty. There are a couple places where you can go, but the ceremony at the Cenotaph at Victory Square is particularly impressive. Starting at 9:45 am and taking place at the park at the corner of West Hastings Street and Cambie, the service includes a performance by the Vancouver Bach Youth Choir, the sounds of a 21-gun salute by the 15th Field Artillery Regiment firing from Portside Park, and a Royal Canadian Air Force fly-past.

Later this Saturday we will meet at the Escape room. We will solve some puzzles that lead the way to the exit. It’s all about teamwork and logical thinking. Can we make it in time? We will meet up at 6:30 pm in front of the escape room. See you there!

– Bart

INTERNeX International Exchange
International Village,
Suite 2077, 2079 – 88 West Pender Street
Vancouver, Canada -V6B 6N9-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

HIGHLIGHTS REVIEW OF THE YEAR 2015: October, November, December

OCTOBER

Last but not least the fourth quarter of 2015. I hope you guys had as much fun as I had looking back on all the awesome things we did.

October started with our amazing overnight trip to Whistler with a group of 22 people. whistlerThe trip was the perfect opportunity to get to know everyone better and I must say that those people are just amazing. Therefore it’s no surprise that we had an awesome time in Whistler with a lot of fun. Additionally we were pretty lucky with the weather.
The sun was shining the entire weekend. On Saturday and Sunday most people did zip lining, some did bungee jumping and some just explored the amazing view on top of the mountains when hiking. We also had two birthdays to celebrate that means we had a good excuse to party.

Canadian Thanksgiving, one of the most famous holidays is celebrated at the second Monday in October. It is similar to the English and European Harvest festival, symbolizing people’s gratitude for everything given by nature or God that sustains them. ThanksgivingdinnerWhile the actual Thanksgiving holiday is on a Monday, Canadians may gather for their Thanksgiving Dinner on any day during the long weekend. The traditional dish for the Thanksgiving dinner is roasted turkey, cranberries, and pumpkin pie.In celebration of the Canadian Thanksgiving the INTERNeX group certainly had a Thanksgiving Dinner. We spent a lovely evening on top of Vancouver’s roof. While enjoying our Dinner at the revolving restaurant in Robson Street we had an incredible view down on Vancouver.

 

NOVEMBER

 
In November 11 Canada  ‘celebrated’  Remembrance Day. We remember soldiers fallen in the line of duty, especially those during World War I and World War II. The date and the time on which the festivities are taking place certainly have a special meaning: The hostilities of World War I ended officially on the eleventh day of November 1918, in the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour. seattle space needleSo, every year at that time is at least one minute of silence to honor all those, we need to remember. Connected to this day is also the custom of wearing a red poppy the weeks leading up to the eleventh of November. This symbol evolved due to the popularity of a poem written by a Canadian writer and soldier John McCrae, In Flanders Fields. It is one of the most famous pieces of Canadian literature and represents the emotions connected to Remembrance Day.

 

We could also cross Seattle off our to-do list since we crossed the border to the States for a day trip to Seattle. As you can see on the photo we had amazing weather! And not only the weather was good. We had super yummy fresh fish at Pike Place Market and quite a lot to explore in downtown Seattle.

 
DECEMBER

Since a bunch of people will be here for Christmas we decided to enjoyed a nice Christmas Dinner together in association with doing Secret Santa. Besides that we also didn’t miss the chance attending at the annual Santa Claus Parade. We went to the Capilano Suspension Bridge Park seeing the hundreds of thousands of lights, the ‘German” Christmas Market and to the Bright Nights in Stanley Park23532018931_e42a616597_o

December and also 2015 are slowly coming to an end as well as my practicum here at INTERNeX. No reason for freaking out, being sad or becoming desperate though! Vivien, one of our candidates is taking over and is managing and organizing a couple of pretty cool events and trips for January and February. Of course we also won’t leave you in the lurch on New Years Eve!

For all the upcoming events check out our Facebook page and stay turned on our social media sites.

The only thing left to say is: HAPPY NEW YEAR! Hope everyone will have a good start in the New Year 2016! Wish you all the best.

 

INTERNeX International Exchange
International Village,
Suite 2077, 2079 – 88 West Pender Street
Vancouver, Canada -V6B 9N9-
Web: internexcanada.wordpress.com
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

REMEMBRANCE DAY

As you might know it’s Remembrance Day this Wednesday, November 11. The holiday is also known as Poppy Day or Armistice Day. But what is Remembrance Day you might ask? 15149724183_8c8974ff5d_bWell, basically it’s a day to remember all Canadians who sacrificed their lives during World War I and World War II. On that day Canadians commemorate the fallen members of the armed forces like soldiers, sailors and airmen. The date and the time on which the festivities are taking place certainly have a special meaning: The hostilities of World War I ended officially on the eleventh day of November 1918, in the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour. So every year at that time is at least one minute of silence to honor all those fallen soldiers. Connected to that day most Canadians wear a red poppy the weeks before November 11. This symbol evolved due to a poem written by a Canadian writer and soldier John McCrae, called “In Flanders Fields”. It’s one of the most famous pieces of Canadian literature.

15770509952_469a5f7876_bIn remembrance of the soldiers fallen in the line of duty Vancouver had a parade last year. Our PR-Coordinators participated and they were absolutely fascinated. They wrote a review about that day; here is a short extract about how they experienced it: “A lot of people met up to show their respect and support […]. It wasn’t just a parade. We could also hear the sounds of shots being fired from cannons; we could see old 2nd World War airplanes flying overhead, poems were being read out loud… For sure this was an unforgettable experience.”

This year the Remembrance Day Ceremony and Parade will start on Wednesday, November 11 at 9:45am at the Victory Square Cenotaph at West Hastings Street and Cambie Street. For more information to the Parade, click here.

Review: Remembrance Day

Yesterday, 11th of November, several parades took place in different areas around Vancouver and in cities across Canada. It was Remembrance Day, so the parades were held to remember Canadian soldiers who died in battles during the First and Second World Wars, as well as wars in Korea, Afghanistan and Iraq. The biggest parade in Vancouver took place in the area around Victory Square, and of course we were there to have a look from the sidelines.

A lot of people met up to show their respect and support for both the veterans still alive and for those who died in battle. There was always something going on. It wasn’t just a parade; We could also hear the sounds of shots being fired from cannons,  we could see old 2nd World War aeroplanes flying overhead, poems were being read out loud… For sure this was an unforgettable experience.

Have a look at more pictures from the parade here.

INTERNeX International Exchange
International Village,
Suite 2077, 2079 – 88 West Pender Street
Vancouver, Canada -V6B 6N9-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

 

Remembrance Day

Hey Everybody! As you might know it’s Remembrance Day this Tuesday, and there’ll be several parades in Vancouver. So what is Remembrance Day? Well basically it’s a day to remember all of the Canadians who sacrificed their lives during World War I and World War II. It’s to remember that these soldiers sacrificed their lives for a greater cause. The parade starts from Victory Square in downtown Vancouver. You can find more information on this parade here.

The event takes place on a Tuesday but it’s a public holiday. We’ll meet up at 9am in front of Vancouver Film School at the corner of the the intersection West Hasting Street and Cambie Street. If you’re not able to join this early you can also join in later. Just post a comment on the Facebook event page, so that I know where we can meet. You can sign up for this event here.

INTERNeX International Exchange
International Village,
Suite 2077, 2079 – 88 West Pender Street
Vancouver, Canada -V6B 6N9-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

Review of the Year: October, November, December

October

September ended and October started with one and the same thing. The last weekend of September, we went to Victoria with a group of 17. It was a trip full of good moments and some surprises during the trip that made it unforgettable. In Victoria, our first activity was the Royal BC museum. It was pretty amazing! You can find inside a very real reconstruction of a Wild West village! The next part of the program was supposed to be a walking tour around Victoria, but it was raining cat and dogs. We went to visit the Empress Hotel in Victoria, one of the most luxury places that I’ve seen in my life. After that, we tried to visit the Beacon Hill Park, but the weather was so bad, that we came back to the hostel. We slept in the Hi-Victoria in Downtown. After a shower and with dry clothes, we went to dinner in the Old Spaghetti Factory.

After that, we decided to go to a pub. The chosen place was the Sticky Wicket. We danced, we had some beers and cocktails, and we had a lot of fun. The next day we went to visit the Craigdarroch Castle. It’s like a Scottish castle but in the middle of Canada. After that we visited the Emily Carr House where the staff opened the house only for us! Emily Carr was a real women, one of the first feminists, environmentalists and one of the first persons who defended the people of the First Nation. Then we went back to the hostel to pick up our stuff and leave Victoria. It was sunny, very sunny for the first moment during the weekend. And suddenly, somebody said: there is a big storm in the north of the Island; all the ferries for this night are cancelled, you have to stay in Victoria another night. Can you imagine our faces? At the beginning we were a little bit worried, but finally we could sleep in the hostel and we could inform our home stay families and our colleagues at home. The people of the Hi-Victoria were super nice to us; they give us movies and pop corn. We spend the Sunday night with some beers, talking until very late. Finally we could take the ferry the next day, and we arrived at Vancouver super tired and dreaming of a hot shower. After all, I have to say that all the mess was at the end super funny.

After this adventure, all of us deserved a little break and something to relax. And the perfect opportunity for that was Thanksgiving. Canadian Thanksgiving, one of the most famous holidays and not to be confused with the U.S. American version is celebrated at the second Monday in October. It is similar to the English and European Harvest festival, symbolizing people’s gratitude for everything given by nature or God that sustains them. While the actual Thanksgiving holiday is on a Monday, Canadians may gather for their Thanksgiving feast on any day during the long weekend. Thanksgiving in Canada is also often a time for weekend getaways. The traditional dish for the Thanksgiving dinner is roasted turkey, cranberries, and pumpkin pie. Watching football on TV is also a part of the modern tradition for many Canadians. Becoming a statutory (public) holiday in 1957, Thanksgiving goes back much further than that. Besides being linked to the before mentioned European traditions, it is also a way to remember the English explorer Martin Frobisher and his search for the Northwest Passage in 1578. As it was common in those times, his journey was a difficult one; made hard and exhausting by severe weather and ice. So when Frobisher and his crew arrived in Frobisher’s Bay, they celebrated the first ceremonial Thanksgiving.

And after this rather contemplative time of the month, we launched into the Halloween season. Stanley Park Ghost Train, the Dunbar Haunted House and – our big Halloween Party in the Blarney Stone. “INTERNeX drops dead – So get your freak on” was a complete success! Crazy costumes, smiles, laughter, a scavenger hunt, drinking games and a costume contest! We danced, we had tons of fun and we enjoyed the whole night! Check out the crazy pictures…

November

And as fall left Vancouver, the PR team had to say good bye to one of its members again. Tobias left us in the beginning of November to continue his education in Germany and was very sad to go back. His 7 weeks have flown by faster than he ever expected.

Fitting to this somewhat sad event, Canada also had another holiday in November, but one of the sadder sort. Remembrance Day, Poppy Day, or Armistice Day – the celebrations have many names but the holiday’s essence is the same in all the Commonwealth countries. We remember soldiers fallen in the line of duty, especially those during World War I and World War II. Special meaning is held by the date and the time the festivities are taking place. Because the hostilities of World War I ended officially on the eleventh day of November 1918, in the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour. So, at that time, there are one or two minutes of silence to honor all those, we need to remember. Connected to this day is also the custom of wearing a red poppy the weeks leading up to the eleventh of November. This symbol evolved due to the popularity of a poem written by a Canadian writer and soldier John McCrae, In Flanders Fields. It is one of the most famous pieces of Canadian literature and represents the emotions connected to Remembrance Day.

However, as November went on, we turned to happier matters again and planned our monthly trip. This time it took us to Whistler for three days, to ski and board and sight-see all day… and party all night!!! Whistler is one of B.C.s famous tourist destinations all year long. And during the winter month you can ski and board where international athletes competed during the 2010 Olympic Winter games. Whether we were skiing and boarding or soaked in a hot tub; went out partying, or enjoyed a dinner cooked with friends, we had a great time. Take a look at Flickr and you’ll see why the world was upside down for some of us during this weekend 🙂

December

And after Whistler, it was suddenly December and the last month of the year had already begun. Everything in Vancouver was noticeably preparing for the merriest holiday of the year and we did our best to get in the mood as well. Whether we went ice skating at Robson Square, visited a fantastic Candy Town or paid a visit to the Vancouver Christmas Market; we were getting ready for Christmas! Christmas is celebrated by millions of people around the world and is one of the most popular modern customs of the holiday includes gift giving. Don’t we all enjoy the Christmassy atmosphere? Christmas trees, Christmas lights, and mistletoes? And after this holly jolly feast is over now, the only thing to look forward to in 2013 is New Year’s Eve. So stay tuned here, we will for sure give you some information on where to party into 2014!

 

 

 

 

 

INTERNeX International Exchange
International Village,
Suite 2077, 2079 – 88 West Pender Street
Vancouver, Canada -V6B 9N9-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Email: pr@internexcanada.com

Remembrance Day Special

Remembrance Day, Poppy Day, or Armistice Day – today’s celebrations have many names but the essence of today’s holiday is the same in all the Commonwealth countries.

Today, we remember soldiers fallen in the line of duty, especially those during World War I and World War II. Special meaning is held by the date and the time the festivities are taking place. Because the hostilities of World War I ended officially on the eleventh day of November 1918, in the eleventh minute of the eleventh hour. So, at that time, there are one or two minutes of silence to honor all those, we need to remember. Connected to this day is also the custom of wearing a red poppy the weeks leading up to the elventh of November. This symbol evolved due to the popularity of a poem written by a Canadian writer and soldier John McCrae, In Flanders Fields. It is one of the most famous pieces of Canadian literature and represents the emotions connected to Remembrance Day. Take a look yourself and be swept up by all this poem conveys.

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly.

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

To listen to the famous poem, how it is sung during the many festivities and parades on this day, click on this link.

Annika

INTERNeX International Exchange
International Village,
Suite 2077, 2079 – 88 West Pender Street
Vancouver, Canada -V6B 9N9-
Web: http://www.internexcanada.com
Email: pr@internexcanada.com